Wipetheslateclean welcomes Carlisle Report

Press Release

 

Wipetheslateclean

Campaign welcomes Peers and MP’s call to wipe the slate clean for young people’s criminal records

Bob Ashford founder of Wipetheslateclean today welcomed the publication of the Carlisle Report a review by a cross party group of MPs and members of the House of Lords which has recommended radical changes to the system of disclosure of criminal convictions by young people.

 

Bob Said:

“These disclosures (often of minor offences committed many years ago) can have a very negative on the employment and educational opportunities throughout young people’s lives when applying for jobs or educational opportunities. Many people are unaware that in accepting police cautions or receiving relatively minor convictions that these often have to be disclosed for the rest of people’s lives. When young people have made a positive decision to stop offending we should do all we can to rehabilitate them. A criminal record should not be a life sentence. I am delighted the aims of the campaign to wipetheslateclean have been recognised. What is needed now is action by the government to implement the recommendations”

 

Bob himself formed the campaign to Wipe the Slate Clean when he found himself barred from becoming a Police and Crime Commissioner in Avon and Somerset because of two minor convictions he committed 48 years ago. His resignation became nation news and in forming the campaign he has been supported by national charities including NACRO, NIACRO, Unlock 2000,User Voice, Business in the Community and the AYM.

 

The Report recommends:

We recommend a further amendment to the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 to

extend the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) filtering rules108

 regarding cautions

and convictions given to under-18s.109

 We propose the following revisions for under

18s, which should be made by the Home Office within the forthcoming two years:

– The above-mentioned time periods for the filtering of cautions and convictions for

under 18s should be reduced;

– Multiple convictions received by 18s should be permissible for filtering, providing

a specified period of time has elapsed since the last conviction;

– Convictions resulting in a custodial sentence should be filtered if the sentence

was 6 months or less; and

– Robbery and burglary offences that do not result in a custodial sentence should

be able to be filtered.

 

 

In the light of this report Bob is also calling for the Government to change the barring legislation for Police and Crime Commissioners to align itself with that of MP’s.

“It is ludicrous that I was and still am barred from becoming a Police and Crime Commissioner because of two offences I committed 48 years ago as a 13 year old. I can be an MP,  the Prime Minister but not a PCC. The barring legislation is recognised by all as a grave error and the government needs to change the legislation before the next election.”